Winter whale watching


It’s that time of the year again – whale watching season, and what better way to see these magnificent creatures than numerous points across the Surf Coast.

Southern Right Whales are a spectacular view from many different locations along the coast

With whales migrating from sub-Antarctic waters (where they feed during the summer months) to the coastline of Australia to breed during winter, sightings are currently at their peak.

Between June and October every year Southern Right Whales, generally females, come within 100 metres of the Coast. Females are returning to areas along the coast to calve and allow the young to feed, gathering strength for the journey back to the sub-Antarctic waters. However, the males, yearlings and young adults remain further out to sea and are more difficult to see.

For more information click here.

It is difficult to compare anything to watching the biggest mammals in water gliding lazily along the southern coastline and there are  several points along the coach at which to view them.

What are the best whale watching vantage points?

There are many lookouts along the Surf Coast to see these magnificent creatures. For a full list of all the lookout from Torquay to Lorne click here.

For an unhindered view of passing whales make your way to Aireys Inlet to the Split Point Lookout which was built by GORCC in 2009.

The Split Point Lookout in Aireys Inlet has fantastic views of the southern coastline

Perhaps it’s in Lorne where only this week have the whales been sighted just 100 metres offshore, easily viewable from the Lorne Foreshore.

The Surf Coast Walk is another option – the 44km track offering many spots with uninterrupted, breathtaking views of the coast.

While you are on your whale watching adventures, if you need somewhere to stay whilst down on the Coast and are looking for affordable, family friendly accomodation why not check out the Torquay or Lorne Caravan Park?

Whatever your vantage point, the sight of one of these incredible creatures is a special and unforgettable experience.

Have you seen whales whilst holidaying down on the coast?  Let us know where they were spotted!

2 thoughts on “Winter whale watching

  • Yesterday, 27th August, 2013, we watched a southern white whale, just off the rocks at Anna Bay, Newcastle, NSW. She was obviously distressed and we think she was having a calf, though we never saw the calf. After watching for 4 hours, she finally started to move along the coast, going north.

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