Elusive fauna captured on camera


The Southern Brown Bandicoot and rare Rufous Bristlebird have been captured on infrared, motion-sensing cameras in Aireys Inlet.

The cameras, which were recently installed by the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee (GORCC) as part of a new conservation monitoring program, record and identify animal activity in coastal habitats.

The below footage shows the Rufous Bristlebird amongst the vegetation:

The footage was collected within weeks of placing the cameras on coastal restoration sites. GORCC Education Activity Leader Peter Crowcroft said the sighting of a bandicoot, in particular, was unexpected and exciting.

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The Southern Brown Bandicoot wandering past the camera at night.

“We are very fortunate the Southern Brown Bandicoot wandered into the monitoring area. We weren’t expecting to have such a good sighting of a bandicoot, especially within the first week.

“We are thrilled to have images of these animals in the area as it provides photographic evidence that the work we are doing is valuable for their survival. Until now there was no real way to confirm that rare species are living in the revegetated areas along the coast, so this evidence is very encouraging,” he said.

A feral cat threatens endangered species in the Aireys Inlet bushland.
A feral cat is captured in the same location as the other fauna was photographed.

Read the full media release here.

Are there any rare species you hope our infrared cameras will find? Let us know in the comments below!

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