Roo family caught on coastal camera


The image of a kangaroo and her joey are among the new images capturing some of the coast’s diverse fauna as part of the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee’s (GORCC) motion-sensor, infrared camera monitoring.

The cameras have been set up in Anglesea and Aireys Inlet in March and April to record and identify animal activity in coastal habitats to help guide conservation strategies.

Kangaroo and joey - anglesea heathlands
A kangaroo and her joey showed their inquisitive side at the Anglesea Healthlands in March, walking in front of the conservation team’s infrared monitoring cameras.

GORCC Education Coordinator Pete Crowcroft said the latest pictures have been the most successful collection of animal images captured.

“We’ve had some really great photos from the Anglesea Heathlands and near the Aireys Inlet lighthouse, which highlight the diverse fauna living in our coastal habitats.”

“The kangaroo and the joey were a particular highlight, with the pair feeding and hanging around and posing beautifully for the cameras. They are the first kangaroo images we’ve found since the monitoring began in 2014.”

“It’s very exciting to see continual animal presences in the rehabilitated conservation sites, especially rare species, such as the Rufous Bristlebird,” he said.

Rufous Bristlebird Aireys Inlet.jpg
The rare Rufous Bristlebird at Aireys Inlet.

The cameras are used as a monitoring and evaluation method into the effectiveness of strategies implemented in GORCC’s five-year Native Vegetation and Weed Action Plan.

Kangaroo resting - anglesea heathlands
It’s a tough life being a kangaroo! This kangaroo took some time out in March to lay in the vegetation at Anglesea.

GORCC Environment and Education Manager Alex MacDonald said the new images were a great snapshot of the fauna diversity in coastal habitats.

“The motion-sensor, infrared cameras are a fantastic resource and help us measure the success from previous conservation and rehabilitation works in these environments,” Ms MacDonald said.

To view the full NVWAP visit our website. Check out our other blog posts for more photos!

Snapshot of the coast

Wildlife streaming into conservation sites

Elusive fauna captured on camera

 

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