Garden Escapees

We’re all spending lots of time at home this year, with many people making the most of the restrictions by getting out into the garden.

Our Conservation team have helped us choose some of the most common plants in backyards -all of which are classed as environmental weeds in Victoria, meaning they are invasive and threatening to our native environment.

Conservation Leading Hand Rachael Beecham said it’s important to remove weeds growing in your garden because they can spread kilometres away from your home.

“Birds, wind and water all spread the seed from weeds for kilometres, which is why it’s so important to remove them from your garden.”

Weed of the Month:

Shade or Fairy CrassulaCrassula multicava subsp multicava

Where it’s from: Native to Southern Africa

Crassula is a spreading to suberect succulent with cream to pink four petalled flowers. It flowers mostly in spring and is drought and shade tolerant. Like most succulents, this plant easily roots and spreads from leaves that fall or break off from the mother plant. They also propagate themselves by producing plantlets on the flowerhead that drop off and develop into independent plants.

This makes it a serious threat to our native environments. Populations are spreading into dry eucalypt forests and other woodlands, dry coastal vegetation and rocky outcrop vegetation.

Shade or Fairy Crassula is another popular garden plant because of its pretty flowers and extremely low maintenance requirements. Shade crassula is regarded as an environmental weed in Victoria.

“Environmental weeds displace and smother the indigenous species of the area which can in turn impact on native fauna’s habitat and populations.”

“Once established in our native environments, these weeds become a time-consuming and costly project to remove. Once they invade areas like cliffs they become almost impossible to remove.”

“The Environmental Weeds of the Surf Coast Shire booklet has great information on correct disposal methods for each weed. You can download it via this link: https://www.surfcoast.vic.gov.au/Environment/Natural-environment/Local-plants/Weeds-of-the-Surf-Coast.”

Great Southern BioBlitz 2020

September is Biodiversity Month and we’re encouraging everyone to get out and record the biodiversity of their backyards and local area. Over the weekend of the 25th – 28th September, the Great Southern BioBlitz will be held – a friendly competition to see which places can observe and record the most biodiversity. This year the event is international, with South America and Africa also taking part to make wildlife observations. 

The purpose of the event is to highlight both the immense biodiversity spread across the southern hemisphere in the flourishing springtime, and to engage the public in science and nature learning.  

GORCC Environmental Education Program Coordinator Pete Crowcroft has been working to organise the event with some other keen naturalists from around Australia.

“We wanted to create a biodiversity survey, or BioBlitz, for people in the southern hemisphere during spring, when the natural world is on full throttle,” Pete said.

Leopard Seal

“Flowers are blooming, insects are emerging, birds are singing, and reptiles are coming out of their winter hibernation. It makes sense for Australia and for the rest of the southern hemisphere to observe life at this time of year.”

Pete said the response from other countries has taken the team by surprise.

“We were really pleased when so many different countries in South America wanted to take part, we were really only expecting Australia to participate.”

“We have run September BioBlitz’s in the past, just for the local Surf Coast region. Last year we had a great result spotting nearly 400 species for the month. This year, competing against not only other areas in Geelong and Australia, but the southern hemisphere! I’m hoping people will get out in force to make observations of our many thousands of different species in this amazing biodiversity hotspot.”

Ringtail Possum

“Usually we would be running activities to celebrate the month and having people get together to explore, but unfortunately we can’t do that this year. It is important that everyone complies with COVID safe regulations when participating in this BioBlitz, and also observes any sensitive species with care and respect, and a leave no trace approach,” Pete said.

To participate you will need to download the iNaturalist app onto your device, or upload pictures directly from your PC onto the website. If you take a picture of any plant or animal and upload it during the weekend, it will automatically be counted for the community, hopefully pushing the Surf Coast up the international leaderboard!

For more information and to get involved visit the Great Southern BioBlitz website: https://greatsouthernbiobl.wixsite.com/website or www.inaturalist.org which hosts a number of how-to videos in the help section.

The project website can be found here: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/great-southern-bioblitz-2020-surf-coast

Garden Escapees

We’re all spending lots of time at home this year, with many people making the most of the restrictions by getting out into the garden.

Our Conservation team have helped us choose some of the most common plants in backyards – all of which are classed as environmental weeds in Victoria, meaning they are invasive and threatening to our native environment. We’ll be showcasing a weed of the month over the next few months.

Conservation Leading Hand Rachael Beecham said it’s important to remove weeds growing in your garden because they won’t stay in your garden.

“Weeds have incredible means of spreading throughout not only your neighbours garden but our native bushlands. Birds, water and wind all spread the seed for kilometres.”

Weed of the Month: Red Hot Pokers Kniphofia uvaria

Where it’s from: Native to South Africa

It’s a fast growing, very tough and invasive plant that is tolerant of the salty coastal environment. It grows to approximately 1.2 metres in height and in thick tufts, and the seed is dispersed by wind, travelling up to 1 kilometre. It also seems to like being burnt and will flower vigorously after fire. This species is regarded as an environmental weed in Victoria and New South Wales.

Pokers are a popular garden plant because they are low maintenance and have striking red and yellow flower heads during winter and spring.

“When removing weeds from your garden, try to remove them before they flower or produce seed. This will help prevent new seedlings emerging the following year. If the weeds are flowering or covered in seed, make sure you put them in your bin.”

Find out more information about weeds in the Surf Coast Shire and how to treat them here.

Signs set to showcase volunteers’ great work

Jan Juc Coast Action (JJCA) has completed its latest project after being a recipient of the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee’s (GORCC) Coastal Grants Program.

The group began the project in June 2019, erecting interpretative signage along the Jan Juc clifftops, providing visitors to the Surf Coast Walk with a before and after view of the area.

It’s not hard to see the huge amount of work the volunteer group has put into the Jan Juc clifftops area, but it will be even easier to see now with new signage in place.

The project aims to highlight to visitors the amount of hard work that has gone into making the area what it is today, showcasing the environmental successes the group has delivered.

Jan Juc Coast Action volunteer Luke Hynes and Great Ocean Road Coast Committee CEO Vanessa Schernickau alongside one of the newly installed signs.

The signs can be found alongside the Surf Coast Walk near Bird Rock Car Park, Jan Juc Beach Car Park and Steps Lookout in Jan Juc – locations that show the direct impact the volunteer group’s efforts have had on creating substantial positive environmental change on the clifftops.

Dedicated JJCA member Luke Hynes, who has been involved with the volunteer group for more than a decade, was thrilled to see the project completed and said it was a tribute to the many hours and great work the group has put in.

The transformation at Steps Lookout from 1995 to now.

Luke also thanked GORCC for their generous assistance, providing a $3,840 grant to get the project off the ground.

“There have been thousands of hours of volunteer work put in to enhance these areas. Hopefully, these pictures tell a bit of a story about how important it is to treat it well,” Luke said.

Not only will these signs provide great insight into the preservation of the Jan Juc clifftops, but they also help educate visitors.

It’s a new-look car park compared to 1980 at Jan Juc Car Park.

The signs read: ‘Our community chose to restore this coastal ecosystem. Help us look after and respect our fragile, diverse and unique habitat.’

The message is clear; the choice is ours to help our precious coastal ecosystems thrive.

The signs also provide visitors with information about JJCA and how they can get involved.

The popular walking track sees plenty of people, both local and tourists, enjoy the area and these signs will help to reduce the negative impact of people entering the protected areas on the clifftops as well as encourage environmental protection.

A perfect track to take a walk on, a far cry from the informal track pictured left 30 years ago.

The coastal vegetation along the clifftops has been restored over many years after human pressures degraded the landscape. With increased awareness, visitors will hopefully gain a better understanding and greater respect and awareness of the role we can all play in protecting the environment.

Jan Juc Coast Action holds a monthly working bee on the first Sunday of the month. Anyone interested in getting involved with the volunteer group can contact Luke Hynes on 0406 113 438 or visit their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/JanJucCoastAction for details.

Each year, GORCC dedicates funds for community-led projects that enhance the natural values of the 37 kilometres of coastal Crown land under its management between Point Impossible and Cumberland River. The grants aim to encourage proactive environmental and heritage protection along the coast. The next round of Coastal Grants opens mid-March 2020.

Season looks bright for Surf Coast hooded plovers

There was cause for celebration at Whites Beach last month as we saw the first hooded plover chick fledge for the season.

It was a celebratory moment for the Friends of the Hooded Plover Surf Coast volunteers and the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee (GORCC) conservation team, who put plenty of work into giving the chick the best chance of survival.

What makes this such a rewarding occasion for those involved, is just how tough it is for these birds to fledge (take first flight) given the challenges faced in their environment. Hooded plovers have just a 2.5% survival rate, therefore having just one or two success stories over the nesting season through September – March is a great achievement.

A hooded plover scrape (nest), with two eggs, demonstrates how difficult it is to spot camouflaged hooded plover eggs on the beach. Note the shoe prints to the left of the scrape.

The shore-nesting birds, fondly referred to as ‘hoodies’, encounter many obstacles over the breeding season. Inclement weather and high tides can wash away nests; predators, such as larger birds, cats and foxes prey on the eggs and chicks; and disturbances from humans and dogs keep parents off their nests as they try to steer perceived threats away.

GORCC Conservation Supervisor Evan Francis said it was a hugely satisfying feeling and thanked all the volunteers and members of the public for playing their part in helping the chick survive.

Evan said it was “very rare” for an egg to make it through to the hatchling stage, which takes 30-35 days for incubation, while it takes another 30 days for a chick to fledge.

Given these factors, Evan was excited to have a much-anticipated success story.

“It’s rewarding, it’s hard to not get attached when you’re out there every second day, you get invested,” he said.

A young hooded plover chick. Photo: Glenn Ehmke.

“We just want to thank everyone for being such good friends of the bird.

“People are more understanding now, most locals are fully aware of them, I think it’s been a success.”

Local volunteers do a wonderful job wardening the nests and educating passers-by, and in this case Friends of the Hooded Plover Surf Coast, led by Jan Lierich, have contributed greatly.

Volunteers like Jan help keep the public informed, ensuring the birds’ safety and bringing plenty of passion to the cause.

Jan said it was heartening to see the chick fledge and said the volunteer group, consisting of roughly 12 members, were proud to play a role in the process but stressed it could not have been done without a number of supporting bodies.

“It’s a team effort. We just want to thank the community and the people who use the beach, because of their help we’ve been able to have a fledgling,” she said.

A juvenile hooded plover prepares to fledge. Photo: Glenn Ehmke.

GORCC has recently been implementing temporary exclusion zones, to help protect the birds and alert the public to nest sites.

The temporary exclusion zones have so far proved promising. Evan said there had been great cooperation from the public and from the two times temporary exclusion zones have been put in place two chicks have managed to fledge.

GORCC currently manages six breeding areas along the coastline at Whites Beach, Point Roadknight, west of Point Roadknight tip, Anglesea, Fairhaven and Moggs Creek.

The conservation team does weekly checks to identify new nesting areas and has found the introduction of fencing and signage over the last 5-7 years has made a big difference in giving shorebirds the best opportunity to thrive.

A pair of hooded plovers.

The breeding season continues to look positive with the news of two hooded plover chicks hatching at Aireys Inlet in late February. To give the chicks the best chance of survival a temporary exclusion zone has been erected at the nesting site, just to the west of Painkalac Creek estuary mouth. The exclusion zone will be in place until the chicks have fledged.

Until then, the team at GORCC and volunteers from Friends of the Hooded Plover Surf Coast have our fingers crossed for another hoodie success story.

About us
The Great Ocean Road Coast Committee is a State Government body responsible for protecting, enhancing, and developing coastal Crown land from Point Impossible to Cumberland River. All funds raised through the organisation’s commercial endeavours are reinvested back into the coast. www.gorcc.com.au

What a way to experience our great coastline

Fancy a first-hand look at the amazing coastline between Torquay and Aireys Inlet? Then the Guided Surf Coast Walk is for you.

There is no better way to experience the beauty of the Surf Coast than by taking part in the Torquay Foreshore Caravan Park‘s guided cultural walk.

The three-day guided tour will take you over 40 kilometres of the Surf Coast coastline, giving participants a great insight into the animals, plants and history of this rugged landscape – making this tour the only one of its kind.

You will get the opportunity to gain a special appreciation for our amazing coastline under the guidance of Wadawurrung woman Corrina Eccles. While for an ecological perspective, walkers will also be joined by Ranger Pete Crowcroft from the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee’s passionate environmental education team.

Guests take part in the Guided Surf Coast Walk.

Day one sees the group begin their journey at the Torquay Foreshore Caravan Park, before being transferred to Point Impossible where a Welcome to Country ceremony will take place before walking back along the coastline to the caravan park. Upon returning to the park, drinks and canapes will be on offer as well as a discount voucher to a local restaurant for dinner.

Day two is the biggest of the three days, with the group traversing a 22 kilometre stretch of coastline. The walk will commence in the morning with guests provided with a packed lunch and snacks.

Corrina leads the walk along many interesting points, sharing her culture and way of life on Wadawurrung Country. Explore midden and ochre sites and immerse yourself in the Aboriginal culture of the area. The group will experience a range of indigenous flora and fauna unique to this area, eventually arriving at Anglesea Family Caravan Park in the late afternoon where you will stay overnight. Dinner is provided at one of Anglesea’s well-known eateries.

Guided Surf Coast Walk participants learn about Wadawurrung Country with guide Corrina Eccles.

The third and final day sees guests walk from Anglesea to Aireys Inlet with Anglesea local Ranger Pete. Once again, breakfast and coffee are provided before hitting the trail.

Guests will receive a tour of the Split Point Lighthouse, made famous by featuring in the popular 90s TV show ‘Round the Twist’. The tour ends with a delicious lunch and Devonshire tea at The Lighthouse Tea Rooms, before guests are transported back to their car in Torquay.

The Guided Surf Coast Walk will take place from 1-3 May this year, with a single ticket costing $800 while a triple share is $450 per person.

Overall inclusions:

  • One nights’ accommodation in a Surfside cabin at Torquay Foreshore Caravan Park
  • One nights’ accommodation in a Superior or Cedar cabin at Anglesea Family Caravan Park
  • Meet and greet including drinks and canapes
  • Local restaurant discount voucher
  • Two continental breakfast hampers
  • Coffee vouchers each morning
  • One packed lunch and trail mix
  • Vouchers for the heated spa at Anglesea Family Caravan Park
  • A well-earned group dinner at a local eatery
  • Lunch and Devonshire tea at The Lighthouse Tea Rooms
  • Tour of Split Point Lighthouse.
One of the many stunning views you will see along the Guided Surf Coast Walk.

This tour is unlike any other and is perfect for those wishing to experience some of the wonderful features this coastline has to offer, while extending their knowledge of the land and its history.

The walk is limited to 25 participants so be sure to book your spot early. Book online now or call Torquay Foreshore Caravan Park to make your booking on 03) 5261 2496.

Swimming group preserving beloved Cosy Corner

It began with a few keen swimmers making their way down for a morning dip at Torquay’s popular beach Cosy Corner. Some 20 years later, it has developed into a dedicated volunteer group known as Friends of Cosy Corner (FoCC).

Back (L-R): Max, Rob and Mal. Front: John, Kim, Terri, Cassie and Liz.
Some members of FoCC absent, the group has 15-20 members.

Those few swimmers quickly turned into five and then 10, but it was only a couple of years ago that the casual swimming group took on the responsibility of helping preserve their beloved Cosy Corner.

Everyday swimmers from FoCC meet at their usual spot at the picnic benches near the bottom car park for a swim and a cup of tea or coffee afterwards. On this particular occasion, members of the group commented on a low-reaching tree branch that hung over their bench. They reached out to see what could be done and were pointed in the direction of the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee (GORCC). This initial contact would go on to create a strong relationship that now sees FoCC keep a first-hand eye on the area.

GORCC conservation team members and members of FoCC at a recent planting day.

FoCC have partnered with GORCC conservation staff in a number of planting days and general upkeep of Cosy Corner and continue to discuss new projects and initiatives to best maintain one of Torquay’s favourite spots for beachgoers. The volunteer group have even been approached by Parks Victoria to help with marine studies.

One of the most recognisable features of Cosy Corner is the arrangement of Moonah trees. FoCC said preserving these was one of their biggest priorities and asked all beachgoers to be mindful of treating them with care and not climbing on the trees, given this causes damage and could lead to the tree dying.

The Moonah trees that add plenty of character to the picnic area.

“It’s just the evolution with more and more people coming down,” one member of FoCC said.

After chatting to a number of the FoCC members, it is clear how passionate the group is about the safekeeping of Cosy Corner, and they’re proud to be making a difference.

“It’s been a really lovely thing (being part of Friends of Cosy Corner) … the swimming’s fantastic, but it’s another focus for the group,” another member commented.

“We use this place almost every day and we’re actually looking after it, it’s a great feeling.”

For anyone interested in getting involved with FoCC, they can contact Cassie Curnow on 0438 089 061.

About us
The Great Ocean Road Coast Committee is a State Government body responsible for protecting, enhancing, and developing coastal Crown land from Point Impossible to Cumberland River. All funds raised through the organisation’s commercial endeavours are reinvested back into the coast. www.gorcc.com.au

A walk through Torquay’s Taylor Park

It only takes a short stroll around Taylor Park to realise its vast array of plants and wildlife, nestled among the suburban area of Torquay.

While taking that same stroll around the park with dedicated volunteer member of Friends of Taylor Park Ian Convery, you get a great insight into the park’s history and what it means to members of the community like Ian.

We began our walk at the pond, accompanied by many ducks being fed by a family. It only took a few minutes into our walk before we bumped into a couple of regulars to the park and stopped for a chat – it’s little things like these that quickly show what Taylor Park offers to the community and why it’s important to preserve it.

Photo: Friends of Taylor Park volunteer Ian Convery.

Ian said there were a number of improvements he and the fellow members of Friends of Taylor Park were hoping to implement in the near future.

“We think for the park to have a future it needs a lot more done to it,” Ian said.

We walked past where a recent planting day had taken place, and then made our way through the trees and shrubbery. Ian spoke of how important it was to keep what Taylor Park, which surrounds the Torquay Bowling Club along The Esplanade, has to offer but also build upon that and make the park not only a great destination for locals but also people visiting Torquay.

Convery was hopeful that with the continued support of Friends of Taylor Park, Taylor Park would not just remain, but become a genuine attraction for those in the community and visiting the area.

 “We’d like to get it to the point where people visit Torquay and know about the park and want to visit it.”

Continued maintenance to walking trails and benches, as well as adding signage regarding the park’s history, was something he was keen to implement.

The Taylor Park Draft Master Plan, released by the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee, highlights the desire to put into action many of Friends of Taylor Park’s hopes.

Educational and historical signage, drinking fountains and landscaping to the pond area are all planned works on the horizon. While in the medium to longer-term, better lighting, better ways to harvest stormwater and additional picnic facilities have all been tabled.

Photo: Great Ocean Road Coast Committee conservation team member Scott Hives (left) with Friends of Taylor Park volunteers at a working bee in 2019.

Anyone wishing to join Friends of Taylor Park and help with the conservation of the area can contact the group on 0418 386 190 or join the Facebook page ‘Friends of Taylor Park Torquay’.

The next volunteer working bee is 10am – 12pm Saturday 8 February.

About us
The Great Ocean Road Coast Committee is a State Government body responsible for protecting, enhancing, and developing coastal Crown land from Point Impossible to Cumberland River. All funds raised through the organisation’s commercial endeavours are reinvested back into the coast. Visit us at www.gorcc.com.au.

Written by Daniel Short, GORCC Communications and Engagement Intern.

Coast Guardians twitch for Aussie Backyard Bird Count

Last month, the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee’s Coast Guardians from Geelong Lutheran College took part in the “Aussie Backyard Bird Count”, an annual citizen science project now in its sixth year run by BirdLife Australia.

Students learned to identify a few common species before the tally and used bird ID books, binoculars and the app field guide to identify as many birds as they could in a 20-minute period. With iPads in hand, ears and eyes ready to get twitching, students worked in groups to log their bird sightings into the app.

Year 9 students from Geelong Lutheran College logging their bird sightings into the Aussie Backyard Bird Count app.

The Coast Guardians submitted a total of 11 checklists, identifying 25 different species between the Gap and the wetlands in Torquay. Geelong Lutheran College has helped to make this location a great area of biodiversity with the revegetation of the Whites Gap car park area over a seven-year period participating in the Coast Guardians program.

The most common sighted bird at this location was the Welcome Swallow as there were a lot of insects buzzing around for them to snack on. The Red Wattlebird and New Holland Honeyeater were also in abundance. One special bird we were pleased to see was the Yellow-rumped Thornbill feeding on the ground beneath the bushes.

The Yellow-rumped Thornbill is the largest and probably the best-known
thornbill, with a striking yellow rump. Photo: BirdLife Australia.

We discussed where the data went to and its value in assisting scientists to spot indicator birds for change, which were most common, and which are declining in numbers. The students were amazed at how many birds they could spot, once they had practice in getting their eye in. This was a great lesson in patience and well-being in nature. The students found it relaxing and were keen to do more surveys.

As of publication, the count for Australia was over 106,000 lists submitted and over 3.6 million birds sighted across 680 species. What a brilliant opportunity for Coast Guardians to participate in a community activity and contribute to science and understanding of nature! Thanks to the app, anybody can contribute as a citizen scientists at www.aussiebirdcount.org.au/submit-a-count/.

Learn more about the Coast Guardians program and how your local school can become involved in this immersive environmental education program for year 9 students at www.gorcc.com.au/education/.

About us
The Great Ocean Road Coast Committee is a State Government body responsible for protecting, enhancing, and developing coastal Crown land from Point Impossible to Cumberland River. All funds raised through the organisation’s commercial endeavours are reinvested back into the coast. Visit us at www.gorcc.com.au.

September Biodiversity Month blitzes past last year

Each September, the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee (GORCC) celebrates the arrival of spring and the explosion of life that comes with it. We are the caretakers of a ‘biodiversity hot spot’, which means there is an unusual diversity of life concentrated within our land management area.

Biodiversity Month runs for the 30 days of September and citizen scientists are encouraged to upload their observations of biodiversity to the online database, iNaturalist.

To facilitate this process, GORCC runs a number of education activities during the month in different habitats and areas of the GORCC management zone, and this year we partnered with Parks Victoria to run sessions in some areas of the Great Otway National Park.

The first community session was held on 1 September, with the day landing on both Father’s Day and Wattle Day. To start the day, Possum Pete led a group in exploring the Anglesea coastal track to see how many species of Wattle (Acacia sp.) and other plants and animals they could find.

A tiny Brown Thornbill (Acanthiza pusilla) pokes its head out from a blooming Silver Wattle (Acacia dealbata) during our celebration of Wattle Day.
Blooming wattle along the Anglesea coastal track.

Later that day, the group explored the Point Roadknight rock pools with 25 keen young biologists and their parents, and they found a great selection of crabs, snails and anemones.

On 7 September GORCC ran a public Rock Pool Ramble at Rocky Point in Torquay. Despite the wintry conditions, 20 members of the public came out to explore wildlife living in the rock pools with us.

On Friday 13 September, GORCC partnered with Parks Victoria and the Friends of Eastern Otways to run a special biodiversity activity. Dubbed ‘Spooky Biodiversity’ because of the date, the group of 30 searched for the nocturnal creatures that might be considered scary at Moggs Creek picnic ground.

Kids surround Possum Pete at the activity trailer to see creepy crawlies up close on the digital microscope at Moggs Creek picnic ground.

There were quite a few insects about including some moths and the group heard the calls of Yellow Bellied Gliders and Boobook Owls when they went for a walk. Local biologist Craig Graham, under the permission and supervision of Parks Victoria, set up nets to capture this Little Forest Bat (Vespadelus vultunus). One of the smallest mammals in Australia, Little Forest Bats can weigh less than 4g.

A Little Forest Bat (Vespadelus vultunus) caught and handled by biologist Craig Graham at the ‘Friday 13th Spooky Biodiversity’ community event.

Thank you to everyone who has contributed their observations to this year’s September Biodiversity Month. What a great snapshot this project provides of the rich diversity of life in this region.

This year, we observed 100 species more than last year, with over 350 species identified. A big congratulations to Neil Tucker for recording the most observations and the greatest number of species throughout the BioBlitz in September, logging an amazing 221 observations and 198 different species. Neil is an active volunteer with coastal conservation groups ANGAIR and Torquay Coast Action and is renowned as an expert on local biodiversity, especially plants and fungi.

To check out all of the observations found throughout the Surf Coast this September BioBlitz, see iNaturalist’s website: www.inaturalist.org/projects/surfcoast-september-bioblitz-2019.

The Great Ocean Road Coast Committee
The Great Ocean Road Coast Committee is a State Government body responsible for protecting, enhancing, and developing coastal Crown land from Point Impossible to Cumberland River. All funds raised through the organisation’s commercial endeavours are reinvested back into the coast. Visit us at www.gorcc.com.au.