What a way to experience our great coastline

Fancy a first-hand look at the amazing coastline between Torquay and Aireys Inlet? Then the Guided Surf Coast Walk is for you.

There is no better way to experience the beauty of the Surf Coast than by taking part in the Torquay Foreshore Caravan Park‘s guided cultural walk.

The three-day guided tour will take you over 40 kilometres of the Surf Coast coastline, giving participants a great insight into the animals, plants and history of this rugged landscape – making this tour the only one of its kind.

You will get the opportunity to gain a special appreciation for our amazing coastline under the guidance of Wadawurrung woman Corrina Eccles. While for an ecological perspective, walkers will also be joined by Ranger Pete Crowcroft from the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee’s passionate environmental education team.

Guests take part in the Guided Surf Coast Walk.

Day one sees the group begin their journey at the Torquay Foreshore Caravan Park, before being transferred to Point Impossible where a Welcome to Country ceremony will take place before walking back along the coastline to the caravan park. Upon returning to the park, drinks and canapes will be on offer as well as a discount voucher to a local restaurant for dinner.

Day two is the biggest of the three days, with the group traversing a 22 kilometre stretch of coastline. The walk will commence in the morning with guests provided with a packed lunch and snacks.

Corrina leads the walk along many interesting points, sharing her culture and way of life on Wadawurrung Country. Explore midden and ochre sites and immerse yourself in the Aboriginal culture of the area. The group will experience a range of indigenous flora and fauna unique to this area, eventually arriving at Anglesea Family Caravan Park in the late afternoon where you will stay overnight. Dinner is provided at one of Anglesea’s well-known eateries.

Guided Surf Coast Walk participants learn about Wadawurrung Country with guide Corrina Eccles.

The third and final day sees guests walk from Anglesea to Aireys Inlet with Anglesea local Ranger Pete. Once again, breakfast and coffee are provided before hitting the trail.

Guests will receive a tour of the Split Point Lighthouse, made famous by featuring in the popular 90s TV show ‘Round the Twist’. The tour ends with a delicious lunch and Devonshire tea at The Lighthouse Tea Rooms, before guests are transported back to their car in Torquay.

The Guided Surf Coast Walk will take place from 1-3 May this year, with a single ticket costing $800 while a triple share is $450 per person.

Overall inclusions:

  • One nights’ accommodation in a Surfside cabin at Torquay Foreshore Caravan Park
  • One nights’ accommodation in a Superior or Cedar cabin at Anglesea Family Caravan Park
  • Meet and greet including drinks and canapes
  • Local restaurant discount voucher
  • Two continental breakfast hampers
  • Coffee vouchers each morning
  • One packed lunch and trail mix
  • Vouchers for the heated spa at Anglesea Family Caravan Park
  • A well-earned group dinner at a local eatery
  • Lunch and Devonshire tea at The Lighthouse Tea Rooms
  • Tour of Split Point Lighthouse.
One of the many stunning views you will see along the Guided Surf Coast Walk.

This tour is unlike any other and is perfect for those wishing to experience some of the wonderful features this coastline has to offer, while extending their knowledge of the land and its history.

The walk is limited to 25 participants so be sure to book your spot early. Book online now or call Torquay Foreshore Caravan Park to make your booking on 03) 5261 2496.

Fence a win for environmental and cultural heritage conservation

Under the guidance of Wadawurrung (Wathaurung Aboriginal Corporation), a rabbit proof fence has recently been installed by the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee (GORCC).

A win for both environmental and cultural heritage conservation, the fence is designed to disrupt destructive rabbit activity in and around Whites Beach, Torquay.

The fence is positioned between an area known as ‘the gap’ along the gravel section of the Esplanade down to the Point Impossible Nude Beach.

The fence forms part of an integrated rabbit control program developed to support and restore ecological processes and preserve the integrity of culturally sensitive sites. Read more

Environmental protection from the next generation of coastal innovators

On Wednesday 5 September, around 160 students from five local schools gathered in Torquay to learn, work-shop ideas and celebrate coastal conservation at the annual Coast Guardians Forum hosted by the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee.

The year 9 students from Northern Bay College, Surf Coast Secondary College, Geelong Lutheran College, Lorne Aireys Inlet P-12 College, and Sacred Heart College had a day of guest presenters, exciting activities and prizes as part of the Great Ocean Road Coast’s award-winning Environmental Education Program. Read more

Coast Guardians Forum a day of learning and fun

The 2017 GORCC Coast Guardians Forum was a day of celebration and inspiration for the 140 year 9 students, teachers and staff from the four local schools who attended at the Surf Coast Shire Grant Pavilion in Torquay. The weather was not in our favour, but the spirits were high for a fun-filled day with delicious food, wonderful donated goods as prizes, and local coastal expertise.

Read more

Beach Kinder a hit with kids

An excursion to the beach provided an exciting new classroom for Jan Juc Preschool kids recently.

The students spent three sessions at their local beach learning about the importance of the coastal environment as part of ‘Beach Kinder’ – a free educational program. The eager little participants learnt about local plants and animals and the danger beach litter poses to the environment and the animals that live in it.

The Great Ocean Road Coast Committee (GORCC) led the sessions which saw a beach treasure hunt, cliff top walk and more.

 

Jan Juc Preschool kids building sandcastles with items collected in the treasure hunt.
Jan Juc Preschool kids building sandcastles with items collected in the treasure hunt. Photo: Jan Juc Preschool

GORCC conservation worker Pete Crowcroft believes that it is necessary to educate young children about their local surroundings and how to preserve it.

“It is a very beneficial program as it helps them to think about the environment and what belongs at the beach and what doesn’t while having fun,” Mr Crowcroft said.

GORCC Conservation Supervisor Georgie Beale teaches Jan Juc Preschool about what belongs at the beach.
GORCC Conservation Supervisor Georgie Beale teaches Jan Juc Preschool about what belongs at the beach. Photo: Jan Jus Preschool

The kinder kids participated in a beach treasure hunt with some exciting finds including shark eggs, sea stars and a bottle nose dolphin spine,  examined fossils in the cliff face and learnt about the endangered Hooded Plovers.

GORCC Conservation Worker Pete Crowcroft holding a dolphin spine as part of beach treasures.
GORCC Conservation Worker Pete Crowcroft holding a dolphin spine as part of beach treasures. Photo: Jan Juc Preschool

Jan Juc Preschool teacher Jane Wilson said she hopes the activity will become an annual event.

“The Jan Juc Preschool has a philosophy of supporting children with their education of the local environment and to support children to appreciate and learn to care about their local areas and this program fitted in perfectly to this philosophy.

“The beach is an integral part of living [in Jan Juc] and the discussions are ongoing. The excursion brings together the ongoing discussion we have over the year.

“Interesting stories about the various uses for kelp in ice cream, toothpaste and Vegemite is something the children will remember for a long time,” she said.

Jan Juc kids listening as GORCC Conservation Worker Pete Crowcroft talks about beach litter
Jan Juc kids listening as GORCC Conservation Worker Pete Crowcroft talks about beach litter

For more information about GORCC’s educational programs and how to get involved, click here.

Students celebrate coastal conservation

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Hilary Bouma (GORCC Education Activity Leader) and Byron Powell, Wathaurung elder.

90 students joined some special guests at a coastal forum in Torquay this week to celebrate of a year of coastal conservation achievements.

Year nine students from four regional schools came together at the environmental education forum which is held each year as part of the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee (GORCC) Coast Guardians Program.

GORCC Community Liaison Manager Jane Rowlands said the forum celebrated the significant contribution the students have made over the past year to the local coastal environment.

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Phil Armato (Fisheries Victoria) shows a wobbegong shark jaw to Lorne P-12 College student, James Wainwright.

“The day included interactive activities and challenges, prominent guest speakers, student presentations and prizes and giveaways.

This year’s guest speakers and special guests included:

•    Wathaurung aboriginal elder Bryon Powell
•    Phil Armato: manager of Marine and Freshwater Discovery Centre for Fisheries Victoria. Previously worked at the RSPCA and Zoos Victoria.
•    Dr Kate Charlton-Robb: founding director and principal researcher at the Australian Marine Mammal Conservation Foundation. Researcher, lecturer, campaigner, and discoverer of the unique species of Port Phillip Bay Dolphins called Burrunan Dolphins.

The day has been designed to increase and extend understanding on topics students have covered over the last twelve months including aboriginal culture, coastal animals and plants and threats to and management of, the natural coastal environment.

“We hope that these Coast Guardians will now graduate to become ongoing ambassadors for our beautiful and fragile coast,” said Ms.Rowlands.

Students received thank you gift packs donated by Quiksilver and, spot prizes donated by other local businesses.

“GORCC thanks Quiksilver and other local businesses for supporting this very special program and for recognising the achievements of these students who are making a very real difference to the environment.

The GORCC Coast Guardians Program sees four schools take ownership of the rehabilitation and conservation of four sites.   Schools involved are:
•    Lorne Aireys P-12 College
•    Geelong Lutheran College
•    Northern Bay College
•    Surf Coast Secondary College

“This is a long term program where students, mainly year 9s, look after a specific site between Torquay and Lorne over 5 years.

“The Coast Guardians Program aims to relate work undertaken on the ground to the school curriculum, linking to subjects such as science, outdoor education and community volunteering,” said Ms. Rowlands.

For more information on the Coast Guardians Program visit http://www.gorcc.com.au.