Curl crew helps planet


Rip Curl employees have teamed up land managers to conduct conservation work along the local coast as part of the annual Rip Curl Planet Day.

Each year the Rip Curl staff from the Torquay Head Office donate one working day to environmental volunteering, working with the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee (GORCC), the Surf Coast Shire, Parks Victoria, and local volunteer groups.

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Rip Curl team members braved the 33 degree day to plant hundreds of indigenous flora at Cosy Corner this Planet Day.

The annual event has seen over 85,000 indigenous Surf Coast plants planted along coastal reserves stretching from Point Impossible through to Bells Beach/Southside.

Rip Curl Team Event and Promotions Manager Mark Flanagan said the day was important to the Rip Curl staff as it provides the opportunity for them to give back to their community.

“The majority of our Torquay staff live on or near the Surf Coast and use the local areas.

“It’s a great feeling for the Rip Curl team to be able to walk past and see the progress of the areas they worked on over the years,” he said.

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Rip Curl team members partnered with the GORCC conservation team to re-vegetate the popular beach destination.

Mr Flanagan said one of Rip Curl’s core values is to be environmentally responsible with Planet Day providing the opportunity for staff members to actively contribute to their local environment.

“Planet Day is a fantastic way to support the team of dedicated land managers and volunteers who spend hundreds of hours every year to make the coast a better place,” Mr Flanagan said.

Rip Curl CEO and Planet Day participant Stephen Kay said he enjoys seeing the results from the Rip Curl staff.

“We value the opportunity to contribute to the local environment and are committed to the future of the program,” he said.

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The team takes a break from the sweltering heat this Planet Day.

Staff are divided into various groups over the two days to complete environmental activities such as indigenous tree planting, eradicating environmental weeds, removing rubbish and implementing water saving strategies.

Long-time Rip Curl team member Dianne McCall has participated in Planet Day every year since it began in 2000, and loves seeing the difference the work has made.

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More than 600 indigenous plants were re-introduced to the Cosy Corner foreshore.

“The day is a great opportunity to socialise and work with people who you wouldn’t normally see in the office whilst also having a positive impact on the coast,” she said.

Local environmental volunteer groups and land managers work to ensure that progress made by the Rip Curl crew is maintained through ongoing conservation works and programs throughout the year.

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Cosy Corner was one of many Torquay areas to receive an environmental make over thanks to the Rip Curl staff this Planet Day.



Rip Curl has a strong determination to be environmentally responsible and encourages everyone to demonstrate environmental stewardship. What are some of the things you do to protect our coast? Let us know in the comments below. 

Volunteers rip into environmental protection


80 Rip Curl employees have joined forces with locals to protect the coastline as part of an annual event that has seen more than 80,000 indigenous plants planted on the Surf Coast over 14 years.

Enthusiastic Rip Curl staff from the Torquay Head Office worked at a range of sites including Point Impossible, Bells Beach, Bird Rock, and Whites Beach.

Rip Curl staff were divided in to 6 teams, coordinated by volunteers from Surfers Appreciating the Natural Environment (SANE), Jan Juc Coast Action, Torquay Coast Action and staff from the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee (GORCC).

Rip Curl staff Aloise Bersan, Sam O'Dwyer and Robbie Cullen aren't afraid to get their hands dirty on the 2014 Rip Curl Planet Day.
Rip Curl staff Aloise Bersan, Sam O’Dwyer and Robbie Cullen aren’t afraid to get their hands dirty on the 2014 Rip Curl Planet Day.

Rip Curl CEO Stephan Kay said the results give him a sense of achievement and pride.

“It’s great to see the transformation of the coastal foreshore that’s occurred as a result of these efforts.

“I love seeing the regenerated sections of the coast that Rip Curl employees have worked on when I’m going for a surf or walking the cliffs,” Mr Kay said.

Each year, Rip Curl gives back to the community and demonstrates a strong commitment to the local environment by giving their employees the opportunity to participate in a paid work day of volunteering.

Rip Curl employees completed a river clean-up and planting day at Spring Creek, one of many locations targeted on the Day,
Rip Curl employees completed a river clean-up and planting day at Spring Creek, one of many locations targeted on the Day.

Planet Day Director Mark Flanagan said the primary focus of the event is to positively contribute to the public spaces in and around the Surf Coast.

“We liaise with the community groups that help manage the areas throughout the whole year and work under their guidelines,” he said.

GORCC Environmental Projects Coordinator Alex Sedger said Rip Curl is a strong advocate for environmental protection.

“The event allows a major global company to give back to the coastal environment, engage their staff, and raise awareness around local environmental issues.

The Rip Curl staff and volunteers were involved in indigenous tree planting, weed eradication, and coastal cleanup works across two days

“The Rip Curl employees weren’t afraid to get their hands dirty in planting and weeding works, and some went to extreme lengths to collect rubbish in Spring Creek using stand up paddle boards,” said Ms. Sedger.

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The Rip Curl team makes cleaning fun using paddle boards along Spring Creek.

 

Ms. Sedger said a number of unexpected items of rubbish were discovered.

“A car battery, bull-bar and about 50 golf balls were removed in the process,” she said.

Click here for further information on the Rip Curl Planet Day, or here to find out how you can start volunteering along the surf coast.

Combined forces sees conservation win


TAFE students have joined forces with a local environmental group, resulting in multiple benefits, including the removal of thousands of invasive weeds and the development of positive, ongoing relationships.

Anglesea, Aireys Inlet Society for the protection of Flora and Fauna (ANGAIR) united with Gordon Conservation and Land Management students recently to remove Sallow Wattle and Boneseed from Anglesea’s outskirts.

The day saw strong relationships formed between the two groups, leading many students to continue to volunteer their time with ANGAIR outside of their studies.

ANGAIR committee member Roger Ganley (left), Surf Coast Shire Environment Officer Leanne Rolfe (yellow), ANGAIR committee member Janet Stephens (front right)and property owner Heather Walker (far right) with Gordon TAFE students during a successful weed removal day within Aireys Inlet.
ANGAIR committee member Roger Ganley (left), Surf Coast Shire Environment Officer Leanne Rolfe (yellow), ANGAIR committee member Janet Stephens (front right)and property owner Heather Walker (far right) with Gordon TAFE students during a successful weed removal day within Aireys Inlet.

The students, inspired by their experience, have been participating in local working bees and assisting with the propagation of indigenous plants.

ANGAIR Membership Secretary Janet Stephens said students developed a great rapport with the volunteers, proving age is no barrier when it comes to conservation.

“They were terrific – not only were we able to get a lot of weeding done, but we were also able to pass on our knowledge and experience for the younger generation to take on board,” she said.

TAFE students working hard at removing harmful weeds on the outskirts of Anglesea.
TAFE students working hard at removing harmful weeds on the outskirts of Anglesea.

Gordon Course Coordinator Amanda May said the day was a huge success, with both parties enjoying the benefits of the partnership.

“ANGAIR has benefited from the injection of youthful energy, enthusiasm and muscle.

“In turn, students have learnt a great deal about weed control, working with volunteers, and planning and running a community event,” Ms May said.

In an additional project, Gordon students have also targeted a Bluebell Creeper weed infestation on private properties within Aireys Inlet.

Surf Coast Environmental Officer Leanne Rolfe (centre) and ANGAIR Committee Member Roger Ganley (right) with grateful landowner who made chocolate snowballs for hardworking volunteers.
Surf Coast Environmental Officer Leanne Rolfe (centre) and ANGAIR Committee Member Roger Ganley (right) with grateful landowner who made chocolate snowballs for hardworking volunteers.

Gordon students Kate Skinner and Rachael Beecham prepared site assessment reports for two Anglesea sites and will now develop a management plan for these selected sites.

“Large amounts of the creeper were removed in June, hopefully protecting rare Orchid plants in the future.

“The beautiful orchids were almost completely covered by the Creeper when we first arrived and we were able to make a positive impact, although there is definitely more to be done,” she said.

For more information on coastal, environmental volunteering visit gorcc.com.au. ANGAIR is always on the lookout for new faces and there are lots of ways you can contribute to the group’s conservation efforts. For more information visit angair.com.au.

 

Related blog posts:

The Peninsula Daisy Bush Funds for rare florahttps://gorcc.wordpress.com/2014/03/03/funds-for-rare-flora/
The Gordon TAFE offers a number of courses that have an environmentally sustainable emphasis. Sustainable careers in focushttps://gorcc.wordpress.com/2012/06/06/sustainable-careers-in-focus/

Ford motors toward healthier coast


Ford employees descended on the coast last month and planted over 1000 plants along the Anglesea River as part of their community service program.

Ford volunteers with Evan Francis from GORCC’s conservation team. Photo: Abhishek Sharma.

The 34 volunteers, who work in the Powertrain Installation subdivision of Ford, planted about 1000 Coastal Saltmarsh plants alongside the river in a Coastal Saltmarsh area.

The activities were led by the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee (GORCC) as part of a range of environmental education and volunteering opportunities GORCC offers to schools and groups.

Ford Senior Development Engineer Alison Bridger said the activities formed part of the Ford 16 hour community service program and the eighth annual Ford Global Week of Caring.

“Ford Motor Company provides salaried employees with the opportunity to spend two days per year volunteering in the community.

“Our team of engineers planted trees, built protective fencing and learnt about the local Coastal Moonah Woodland restoration projects.

“Mike and Evan from the GORCC conservation team taught us about the types of trees we were planting and protecting and explained what an important part of the local coastal environment they are,” she said.

Ford volunteers planting at Anglesea. Photo: Abhishek Sharma.
Ford volunteers planting at Anglesea. Photo: Abhishek Sharma.

Ms Bridger said everyone enjoyed the chance to get out of the office for a day.

“The work was muddy and exhausting, but very satisfying.”

Anyone can get involved in coastal volunteering.  Its fun, a great way to meet people and it has health benefits too.

GORCC Coast Project Manager Mike Bodsworth said volunteering provides hundreds of thousands of dollars’ worth of assistance to GORCC each year, mainly through conservation work.

“It’s also a great way for us to build and maintain relationships with local people,” he said.

The many environmental volunteer groups that operate along the GORCC managed coast are always looking for more members, even those able to lend a hand for an hour or two.

“Volunteering is a perfect way to ‘give back’ to the coast you love.

“Getting outside, doing something worthwhile and getting your hands dirty also has multiple health benefits and brings a sense of satisfaction,” Mr. Bodsworth said.

For more information on coastal environmental volunteering visit www.gorcc.com.au or call 5220 5055.

This article appeared in the Surf Coast Times Green the Coast Column

Related blog posts:

dsc00188GORCC thanks volunteers
img_0118Indigenous groups join weed action
leanne-booley-permission-to-use Adults delve into environmental education