Monitoring coastal erosion in Anglesea


The Great Ocean Road coast is constantly changing.

While Victoria has a long history of weather variability such as storms, droughts and floods, climate change is projected to increase risks to coastal environments through drivers such as sea-level rise, change in wave-direction and increases in swell energy and storm tide events. These drivers affect coastal erosion, sediment supply and inundation and are expected to vary geographically across Victoria’s coastal zone.

The Victorian Coastal Monitoring Program (VCMP) aims to provide communities with information on coastal condition, change, hazards, and the expected longer-term impacts associated with climate change that will support decision making and adaptation planning.

Led by the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP), the program is being implemented in partnership with community groups, university institutions, and public land managers including the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee (GORCC). This valuable research will help inform options to minimise the impacts of coastal erosion and understand the impacts of climate change on our coastal environments.

Several sites along the Victorian coast have been chosen for inclusion in the study, including GORCC managed land at Point Roadknight and Demons Bluff in Anglesea. Data collected from the mapping software will be interpreted and used to assist in the planning of future works along the coast.

To help monitor our shorelines, two members from GORCC’s conservation team are currently undertaking training with Deakin University in the use of small aerial drones.  As part of the program, GORCC will coordinate with four local citizen scientists participating in the program.

To find out more about the program and future opportunities to be involved as a citizen scientist, head to www.coastsandmarine.vic.gov.au/coastal-programs/victorian-coastal-monitoring-program.

Photos: GORCC conservation staff undertake drone training with Deakin University.

The Great Ocean Road Coast Committee

The Great Ocean Road Coast Committee is a State Government body responsible for protecting, enhancing, and developing coastal Crown land from Point Impossible to Cumberland River.
www.gorcc.com.au

Share our Shores from Coast to Coast


The Great Ocean Road Coast Committee and Barwon Coast Committee of Management have joined forces with a simple message for visitors of the coast this summer.

From Ocean Grove on the Bellarine Peninsula to Cumberland River on the Surf Coast, we are asking beachgoers to ‘Share our Shores’.

The Share our Shores campaign focuses on all aspects of equitable use by all types of beach users. Read more

Nurdles prove major hurdle for marine life


What’s a nurdle? A nurdle is a very small pellet of plastic which serves as the key material in the manufacture of plastic products. Countless billions of these small plastic balls are used each year to make nearly all our plastic products.

Accidental spillage and mishandling means that countless nurdles have ended up in our oceans, wreaking havoc on the environment.

Mistaken for food by our marine-life and seabirds, nurdles and other plastics can make animals very sick when ingested.

Read more

Victorian Coastal Award Winners


The Great Ocean Road Coast Committee is honoured to win a Victorian Coastal Award for our education program with the Honourable Lily D’Ambrosio MP.  A huge congratulations to Peter Crowcroft, Hilary Bouma, Katie Hart and all of the Great Ocean Road Coast staff involved.  Special thanks to all the of students, caravan park campers, volunteers, businesses, teachers, parents and all the other coastal education supporters.
Read more

Lorne caring along the Bert Alsop Track


The Bert Alsop Track is a scenic walking track along the Lorne foreshore, linking North Lorne to the town’s centre and offering views across Louttit Bay and is a popular route for cyclists, walkers, and joggers.

Over the past 6 months the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee’s conservation team has been busy with the woody weed removal that started with the Green Army program in 2016, and the end of 2017 saw all of the woody weeds from the start of the track to the ‘Fat Ladies’ car park removed. This was done with the generous help of a Ford corporate group, LorneCare volunteers, and Great Ocean Road Coast’s conservation and foreshore teams.

Read more