Swimming group preserving beloved Cosy Corner

It began with a few keen swimmers making their way down for a morning dip at Torquay’s popular beach Cosy Corner. Some 20 years later, it has developed into a dedicated volunteer group known as Friends of Cosy Corner (FoCC).

Back (L-R): Max, Rob and Mal. Front: John, Kim, Terri, Cassie and Liz.
Some members of FoCC absent, the group has 15-20 members.

Those few swimmers quickly turned into five and then 10, but it was only a couple of years ago that the casual swimming group took on the responsibility of helping preserve their beloved Cosy Corner.

Everyday swimmers from FoCC meet at their usual spot at the picnic benches near the bottom car park for a swim and a cup of tea or coffee afterwards. On this particular occasion, members of the group commented on a low-reaching tree branch that hung over their bench. They reached out to see what could be done and were pointed in the direction of the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee (GORCC). This initial contact would go on to create a strong relationship that now sees FoCC keep a first-hand eye on the area.

GORCC conservation team members and members of FoCC at a recent planting day.

FoCC have partnered with GORCC conservation staff in a number of planting days and general upkeep of Cosy Corner and continue to discuss new projects and initiatives to best maintain one of Torquay’s favourite spots for beachgoers. The volunteer group have even been approached by Parks Victoria to help with marine studies.

One of the most recognisable features of Cosy Corner is the arrangement of Moonah trees. FoCC said preserving these was one of their biggest priorities and asked all beachgoers to be mindful of treating them with care and not climbing on the trees, given this causes damage and could lead to the tree dying.

The Moonah trees that add plenty of character to the picnic area.

“It’s just the evolution with more and more people coming down,” one member of FoCC said.

After chatting to a number of the FoCC members, it is clear how passionate the group is about the safekeeping of Cosy Corner, and they’re proud to be making a difference.

“It’s been a really lovely thing (being part of Friends of Cosy Corner) … the swimming’s fantastic, but it’s another focus for the group,” another member commented.

“We use this place almost every day and we’re actually looking after it, it’s a great feeling.”

For anyone interested in getting involved with FoCC, they can contact Cassie Curnow on 0438 089 061.

About us
The Great Ocean Road Coast Committee is a State Government body responsible for protecting, enhancing, and developing coastal Crown land from Point Impossible to Cumberland River. All funds raised through the organisation’s commercial endeavours are reinvested back into the coast. www.gorcc.com.au

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