Wayne and Julie join the team

Assistant Torquay Foreshore Caravan Park Managers – Wayne and Julie Del Marco

Wayne and Julie join the Torquay Foreshore Caravan Park management team as ongoing Assistant Managers at the busy holiday destination.

Wayne and Julie have spent the past five years managing caravan parks in Forster, including the Happy Halliday’s Caravan Park and Lakeside Resort Forster, in northern New South Wales. Read more

Caravan Parks get a breath of fresh air

Our Torquay and Lorne Foreshore Caravan Park management teams have undergone a change in management with new park managers, assistant park managers, commercial manager and marketing communications officer being appointed in the past six months.

Read more

Summer by the Sea success

More than 200 beachgoers took part in GORCC led and funded environmental education activities this summer as part of the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning and Parks Victoria 2016 Summer by the Sea (SBTS) program. Read more

Free coastal fun for all

Summer by the Sea is almost here and in 2015 the program features stand up paddle-boarding – a new addition to a growing line-up of free activities.

The Department of Environment and Primary Industries and Parks Victoria program which runs from 2-26 January 2015, is an opportunity for everyone to discover Victoria’s marine and coastal environment.

In 2015 more than 300 free, guided activities will be on offer across the state.  In the Surf Coast region activities are being funded and run by the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee (GORCC), a program partner.

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GORCC Education Activity Leader Pete Crowcroft with little participant Hugh, holding up a piece of whale skeleton.

 

Stand up paddle boarding will feature in Torquay and Lorne and GORCC Education Activity Leader Pete Crowcroft who is organising and leading activities on the Surf Coast, said the activity is a fun way to explore and learn about estuaries and rivers.

“Stand up paddle-boarding is a popular but expensive recreational activity so we’re pleased to be able to offer it for free to participants,” he said.

In addition to activities for the more adventurous such as snorkelling, canoeing and stand up paddle-boarding, there are a huge variety of options available with something for every age and level of ability.

Participants can engage in everything from fossil safaris and walking tours through to coastal craft and playing detective both on the beach and in the bush.

“Those looking for something a little more relaxed can engage in activities like guided coastal walks along the stunning Surf Coast Walk, kite making sessions, rockpool rambles or calico craft,” said Mr. Crowcroft.

GORCC sponsored activities will be offered in Torquay, Anglesea, Aireys Inlet and Lorne and at the Torquay NightJar Markets.

“It’s wonderful to be able to get people of all ages to engage with our incredible coastline and experiencing and learning about the environment.

“It is particularly great for kids, as it’s very important that they learn to connect with and appreciate the natural environment from a young age,” Mr. Crowcroft said.

GORCC Community Liaison Manager, Jane Lovejoy said every previous January for four years GORCC had run a free environmental education program for campers.

“We are excited to partner with DEPI and Parks Victoria in Summer by the Sea and expand our activities to make them available to everyone on the coast.

“We look forward to seeing excited and happy participants of all ages enjoying what we have on offer,” she said.

Bookings are essential for most activities and the majority of activities are free.  For more information, visit www.depi.vic.gov.au or www.parks.vic.gov.au.

Tis the season to be safe

Summer is the perfect time to visit our beautiful beaches along the surf coast and enjoy the glorious sunshine.

To ensure everyone has a great time this holiday season, read our top tips for keeping you and your family safe.

Photo: Ferne Millen Photography
Photo: Ferne Millen Photography

Water safety

Swim between the flags

Swimming between the flags is one of the easiest ways to stay safe this summer. Volunteer and paid lifeguards are patrolling Victorian beaches all summer to help protect beachgoers. The ocean is unpredictable which is why you always need someone looking out for you.

If you have young children, please remember that you must be within an arm’s reach of your child at all times and give them your full attention to ensure their safety.

You can view a full list of patrolled beaches and key dates in Victoria on Life Saving Victoria’s website. http://www.lifesavingvictoria.com.au/www/html/1402-patrolled-beaches.asp

If you are swimming in an unpatrolled beach, make sure you read and obey the safety signs and check that it is okay to swim before you enter the water as conditions can change regularly. It is vital that you know how to swim well and always recommended to have someone to look out for you whilst you are in the water.

More safety by the water information can be found on Life Saving Victoria’s website.

Wear a lifejacket

The Victorian boating regulations require Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs) to be carried on a boat for all persons.

All occupants must  wear a PFD if they are:

  • in a powerboat up to and including 4.8 metres in length
  • off-the-beach sailing yachts
  • in a personal watercraft
  • using canoes, kayaks, rowing boats and rafts
  • using a pedal boats, fun boats and stand up paddle boards
  • kite boarding and sail boarding
  • a recreational tenders
  • a child under the age of 10

For more information about the Victorian regulations click here.

Cliff Erosion IMG_6339

Take caution around cliffs

Many areas along the coast are subject to seasonal coastline erosion, especially Jan Juc and Anglesea regions causing unstable cliffs. To keep your family safe, please read and obey the advisory signs and take care when near cliffs. It is recommended to stay on designated walking tracks to avoid areas of cliff instability.

What can I do?

  • Avoid walking near cliff edges, or at the base of cliffs especially after wet weather and high tides
  • Keep to the walking tracks
  • Do not climb on cliffs as this can cause localised damage and increase the rate of erosion
  • Avoid damaging the vegetation as this promotes water infiltration and reduces erosive runoff
  • Obey all signs and stay behind safety fences
  • If you see evidence of a recent cliff collapse, take a photo and report it to your local land manager

For more information about unstable cliffs visit the Department of Environment and Primary Industries website click here.

IMG_1175

Time check the tides

There are several spots between Point Addis and Anglesea River that can become impassable at high tide. It is important to check the current tide times and be aware of tidal changes to avoid being caught. Always read the warning signs and familiarise yourself with the area before walking along the coastline. If you are unsure about an area ask a local or seek further information.

For information about local coastal walks and their accessibility click here.

Related blogs:

img_0683 Beachgoers and dunes at risk
?????????? Top tips to care for coast
Surfcoast Shire's Cr David Bell together with GORCC's Georgie Beale encouraging beachgoers to take 3 pieces of rubbish when they leave the coast this summer.Take 3 to keep coast healthy

Keeping beautiful starts with you

With Keep Australia Beautiful Week 2010 starting next Monday, 23 August, there’s really no time like the present to focus on the simple things we can each do in our daily lives to reduce the negative impacts we humans are having on our environment.

This year’s event is focusing on public place recycling to help reduce litter on our streets and, for those of us who live and work on the coast, on our beaches, coastal reserves, caravan parks and the like.

Did you know that of the 43.5 million tonnes of waste we Australians produce every year, just over half is recycled while the other half (around 21 million tonnes) still goes to landfill? Did you also know that, although we’re very good at recycling our household waste, we’re not so good at recycling when we’re out and about away from home? This is where public place recycling comes in.

Rather than sending our empty drink bottles, cans, food containers and other recyclable items straight to landfill by consigning them to rubbish bins (or worse, not binning them at all!), from here on in we should each make every effort to recycle them by using public place recycling bins or, if these are unavailable, by taking them home for recycling. How hard can that be?

The Great Ocean Road Coast Committee has for some years now been working to encourage beachgoers, foreshore users and campers to dispose of their waste appropriately by providing recycling bins in our caravan parks and coastal reserves.

Through our involvement in groups such as the Barwon Regional Waste Management Group and participation in programs such as Waste Wise and Resource Smart, we are also endeavouring to improve our own practices and to educate others by spreading the word (including through this blog).

At the end of the day however, it all comes down to you and your behaviour. What do you do, for example, when you’re enjoying a break at the beach? Do you recycle your recyclables and bin your non-recyclables? Or do you leave them behind for other people to swim in? (Now, if everyone did that, then you have probably been swimming in rubbish too!)

Check out the Keep Australia Beautiful Week website for more information, including tips and resources to help ensure you are recycling right, and to find out what your rubbish is being ‘reincarnated’ into. After all, keeping beautiful starts with you.