Warmer weather brings hope for hoodies

Our much-loved Hooded Plovers have been busy with nests located at Point Impossible, Point Roadknight and Moggs Creek, all with three eggs.

The vulnerable beach-nesting shorebirds have one of the lowest survival rates of any species with only 1 in every 100 chicks reaching flying age. Read more

10 ways to protect the locals

The Hooded Plover is extremely sensitive to disturbances from humans, dogs and predators.ย Without human assistance, the Hooded Plover has a 2.5% chance of survival from chick to egg, which is why it is so important we all work together to #SaveTheHoodie. Read more

Hoodies hatch! Babies at Pt Impossible

Three vulnerable Hooded Plover chicks have hatched at Point Impossible over the weekend, making them the first chicks to hatch on the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee (GORCC) managed land this year. Read more

Bad behaviour harming coast

Illegal behaviour on coastal reserves such as lighting fires, littering and destroying vegetation is impacting the environment and sparking safety concerns, with the Jan Juc clifftops a particular problem zone. Read more

Rare bird’s distinct call

You may have heard the unique vocal call of the Rufous Bristlebird, but did you know that the Surf Coast is one of the last places in the world that you are likely to see these birds?

Adult male- Rufous Bristlebird- photo courtesy of Graemechapman.com.au
Adult male- Rufous Bristlebird- photo courtesy of Graemechapman.com.au

The Rufous Bristlebird (Dasyorni Broadbenti) is only found in Australia with a predominance along coastal areas in south-western Victoria.ย  The species have previously been sighted in south-western Western Australia and south-eastern South Australia, but unfortunately frequent burning has led to its extinction in W.A.

The medium-sized songbird has a loud and distinctive vocal call which makes the bird easily identifiable.

Click here to hear the vocal call between two Rufous Bristlebirds, courtesy of the Internet Bird Collection.

The Rufous Bristlebird is threatened nationwide due to habitat loss from clearing for urban developments and agriculture. They are also prone to predation from foxes and cats.

There have been sightings of the rare bird along the coast between Anglesea and the Gelenlg River.

Have you seen or heard a Rufous Bristlebird in your area? Let us know in the comments below.

For more information about the rare bird click here.