What a way to experience our great coastline

Fancy a first-hand look at the amazing coastline between Torquay and Aireys Inlet? Then the Guided Surf Coast Walk is for you.

There is no better way to experience the beauty of the Surf Coast than by taking part in the Torquay Foreshore Caravan Park‘s guided cultural walk.

The three-day guided tour will take you over 40 kilometres of the Surf Coast coastline, giving participants a great insight into the animals, plants and history of this rugged landscape – making this tour the only one of its kind.

You will get the opportunity to gain a special appreciation for our amazing coastline under the guidance of Wadawurrung woman Corrina Eccles. While for an ecological perspective, walkers will also be joined by Ranger Pete Crowcroft from the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee’s passionate environmental education team.

Guests take part in the Guided Surf Coast Walk.

Day one sees the group begin their journey at the Torquay Foreshore Caravan Park, before being transferred to Point Impossible where a Welcome to Country ceremony will take place before walking back along the coastline to the caravan park. Upon returning to the park, drinks and canapes will be on offer as well as a discount voucher to a local restaurant for dinner.

Day two is the biggest of the three days, with the group traversing a 22 kilometre stretch of coastline. The walk will commence in the morning with guests provided with a packed lunch and snacks.

Corrina leads the walk along many interesting points, sharing her culture and way of life on Wadawurrung Country. Explore midden and ochre sites and immerse yourself in the Aboriginal culture of the area. The group will experience a range of indigenous flora and fauna unique to this area, eventually arriving at Anglesea Family Caravan Park in the late afternoon where you will stay overnight. Dinner is provided at one of Anglesea’s well-known eateries.

Guided Surf Coast Walk participants learn about Wadawurrung Country with guide Corrina Eccles.

The third and final day sees guests walk from Anglesea to Aireys Inlet with Anglesea local Ranger Pete. Once again, breakfast and coffee are provided before hitting the trail.

Guests will receive a tour of the Split Point Lighthouse, made famous by featuring in the popular 90s TV show ‘Round the Twist’. The tour ends with a delicious lunch and Devonshire tea at The Lighthouse Tea Rooms, before guests are transported back to their car in Torquay.

The Guided Surf Coast Walk will take place from 1-3 May this year, with a single ticket costing $800 while a triple share is $450 per person.

Overall inclusions:

  • One nights’ accommodation in a Surfside cabin at Torquay Foreshore Caravan Park
  • One nights’ accommodation in a Superior or Cedar cabin at Anglesea Family Caravan Park
  • Meet and greet including drinks and canapes
  • Local restaurant discount voucher
  • Two continental breakfast hampers
  • Coffee vouchers each morning
  • One packed lunch and trail mix
  • Vouchers for the heated spa at Anglesea Family Caravan Park
  • A well-earned group dinner at a local eatery
  • Lunch and Devonshire tea at The Lighthouse Tea Rooms
  • Tour of Split Point Lighthouse.
One of the many stunning views you will see along the Guided Surf Coast Walk.

This tour is unlike any other and is perfect for those wishing to experience some of the wonderful features this coastline has to offer, while extending their knowledge of the land and its history.

The walk is limited to 25 participants so be sure to book your spot early. Book online now or call Torquay Foreshore Caravan Park to make your booking on 03) 5261 2496.

Swimming group preserving beloved Cosy Corner

It began with a few keen swimmers making their way down for a morning dip at Torquay’s popular beach Cosy Corner. Some 20 years later, it has developed into a dedicated volunteer group known as Friends of Cosy Corner (FoCC).

Back (L-R): Max, Rob and Mal. Front: John, Kim, Terri, Cassie and Liz.
Some members of FoCC absent, the group has 15-20 members.

Those few swimmers quickly turned into five and then 10, but it was only a couple of years ago that the casual swimming group took on the responsibility of helping preserve their beloved Cosy Corner.

Everyday swimmers from FoCC meet at their usual spot at the picnic benches near the bottom car park for a swim and a cup of tea or coffee afterwards. On this particular occasion, members of the group commented on a low-reaching tree branch that hung over their bench. They reached out to see what could be done and were pointed in the direction of the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee (GORCC). This initial contact would go on to create a strong relationship that now sees FoCC keep a first-hand eye on the area.

GORCC conservation team members and members of FoCC at a recent planting day.

FoCC have partnered with GORCC conservation staff in a number of planting days and general upkeep of Cosy Corner and continue to discuss new projects and initiatives to best maintain one of Torquay’s favourite spots for beachgoers. The volunteer group have even been approached by Parks Victoria to help with marine studies.

One of the most recognisable features of Cosy Corner is the arrangement of Moonah trees. FoCC said preserving these was one of their biggest priorities and asked all beachgoers to be mindful of treating them with care and not climbing on the trees, given this causes damage and could lead to the tree dying.

The Moonah trees that add plenty of character to the picnic area.

“It’s just the evolution with more and more people coming down,” one member of FoCC said.

After chatting to a number of the FoCC members, it is clear how passionate the group is about the safekeeping of Cosy Corner, and they’re proud to be making a difference.

“It’s been a really lovely thing (being part of Friends of Cosy Corner) … the swimming’s fantastic, but it’s another focus for the group,” another member commented.

“We use this place almost every day and we’re actually looking after it, it’s a great feeling.”

For anyone interested in getting involved with FoCC, they can contact Cassie Curnow on 0438 089 061.

About us
The Great Ocean Road Coast Committee is a State Government body responsible for protecting, enhancing, and developing coastal Crown land from Point Impossible to Cumberland River. All funds raised through the organisation’s commercial endeavours are reinvested back into the coast. www.gorcc.com.au

A walk through Torquay’s Taylor Park

It only takes a short stroll around Taylor Park to realise its vast array of plants and wildlife, nestled among the suburban area of Torquay.

While taking that same stroll around the park with dedicated volunteer member of Friends of Taylor Park Ian Convery, you get a great insight into the park’s history and what it means to members of the community like Ian.

We began our walk at the pond, accompanied by many ducks being fed by a family. It only took a few minutes into our walk before we bumped into a couple of regulars to the park and stopped for a chat – it’s little things like these that quickly show what Taylor Park offers to the community and why it’s important to preserve it.

Photo: Friends of Taylor Park volunteer Ian Convery.

Ian said there were a number of improvements he and the fellow members of Friends of Taylor Park were hoping to implement in the near future.

“We think for the park to have a future it needs a lot more done to it,” Ian said.

We walked past where a recent planting day had taken place, and then made our way through the trees and shrubbery. Ian spoke of how important it was to keep what Taylor Park, which surrounds the Torquay Bowling Club along The Esplanade, has to offer but also build upon that and make the park not only a great destination for locals but also people visiting Torquay.

Convery was hopeful that with the continued support of Friends of Taylor Park, Taylor Park would not just remain, but become a genuine attraction for those in the community and visiting the area.

 “We’d like to get it to the point where people visit Torquay and know about the park and want to visit it.”

Continued maintenance to walking trails and benches, as well as adding signage regarding the park’s history, was something he was keen to implement.

The Taylor Park Draft Master Plan, released by the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee, highlights the desire to put into action many of Friends of Taylor Park’s hopes.

Educational and historical signage, drinking fountains and landscaping to the pond area are all planned works on the horizon. While in the medium to longer-term, better lighting, better ways to harvest stormwater and additional picnic facilities have all been tabled.

Photo: Great Ocean Road Coast Committee conservation team member Scott Hives (left) with Friends of Taylor Park volunteers at a working bee in 2019.

Anyone wishing to join Friends of Taylor Park and help with the conservation of the area can contact the group on 0418 386 190 or join the Facebook page ‘Friends of Taylor Park Torquay’.

The next volunteer working bee is 10am – 12pm Saturday 8 February.

About us
The Great Ocean Road Coast Committee is a State Government body responsible for protecting, enhancing, and developing coastal Crown land from Point Impossible to Cumberland River. All funds raised through the organisation’s commercial endeavours are reinvested back into the coast. Visit us at www.gorcc.com.au.

Written by Daniel Short, GORCC Communications and Engagement Intern.

Northern Bay College students lend a hand

A group of year 9 students from Northern Bay College have been doing some fantastic environmental work throughout term one with Great Ocean Road Coast Committee’s Coast Guardians program.

The year 9 students have been working closely with Great Ocean Road Coast’s Hilary Bouma, Education Coordinator of the Coast Guardians program, doing a variety of activities in their adopted area of Spring Creek, Torquay.

Read more

Rubbish dumped at Torquay’s Taylor Park

Great Ocean Road Coast Committee staff were left frustrated after a small truck load of rubbish and debris was illegally dumped on the Beach Road side of Taylor Park last night.

Discarded pieces of concrete, bricks and other building supplies were left in Taylor Park on top of mulch and dirt piles the Great Ocean Road Coast use to improve the vegetation at the popular park area. Read more

Volunteer Week ft. Students

Students today.  Volunteers tomorrow.  As part of National Volunteer Week (8-14 May 2017) we are celebrating all our wonderful environmental warriors, including the armies of students that care for the coast each term.

More than 470 students have participated in our Environmental Education Program in Term 1 alone, with over 1,400 students experiencing the hands on learning last year. Read more