Environmental destructors: the common rabbit in focus


When Thomas Austin introduced rabbits to Geelong in 1895, it is hard to imagine he had any idea of the problems this would cause. Nearly 118 years on, rabbits have become one of the coasts (and indeed Australia’s) biggest pests and show no sign of disappearing.

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Why are rabbits such a big problem?

While they may look cute and fluffy, rabbits cause large amounts of damage to crops and immeasurable damage to the environment, explains Surfcoast and Inland Plains Network Pest, Plant and Animal Project Manager Brian Vagg.

“Rabbits are suspected of being the most significant known factor in species loss in Australia [although] the loss of plant species is unknown at this time.

“They are also responsible for serious erosion problems as they eat native plants, leaving the topsoil exposed and vulnerable to sheet, gully and wind erosion,” Mr Vagg said.

What can we do to control the current rabbit population?

Mr Vagg said education and people working together on a large scale is the most effect means to control rabbit populations.

“Land managers/holders are responsible for controlling pest animals on their land, but many simply do not know where to start,” he said.

Control which takes place on a gradual month by month, year to year level is proving to be the most effective with neighbours working together using a variety of methods.

Successful methods can include fumigation, baiting, trapping, filling in existing warrens and removing possible burrow sites such as wood piles and gorse.

“Most rabbit control methods are quite labor-intensive and need to be done on a regular basis en mass ideally.

“Poisoning is probably the most widely used of the conventional techniques, as it requires the least effort. Two commonly used poisons for rabbit control are sodium fluoracetate (1080) and pindone,” he said.

For more information on rabbit control in the Surf Coast area contact Brian Vagg on scipn@bigpond.com

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